March 2018 Health Newsletter

Print-Friendly Newsletter

chiro 7g 16 logo 6


Dear Patients,

HAPPY SPRING!!! Better weather means gardening, taking walks and participating in outdoor sports. It also means reminding my patients to stretch before you preform any physical activity to avoid injury. By maintaining regular adjustments you will enjoy the nice weather with a stronger, healthier body. Call our office at 248-348-7530 to make an appointment.


Dr. Nick and the Girls



Current Articles

» Acute Low Back Pain - What's The Prognosis?
» House Introduces Bill to Expand Chiropractic Access...Military Retirees Families
» Jump For Your Adjustment!
» Obesity Linked to Chronic Back Pain

Acute Low Back Pain - What's The Prognosis?

According to a newly published study the previous low back pain (LBP) practice guidelines used by physicians have underestimated the likelihood of acute bouts of LBP recurring as well as turning into longer term chronic LBP. In the study, researchers followed 605 acute LBP patients who had an average pain intensity score of 5.6 out of 10 and a disability score of 15.8 out of 24. Eight percent had declared sick leave between pain onset and the baseline interview. Thirteen percent of 521 patients (86% follow-up) experienced chronic pain at 6 months and 19% of 443 patients at 2 years. At 6 months, 54% had experienced at least 1 LBP recurrence, and 47% in the subsequent 18 months. So what does this all mean? Simply, that LBP has a high tendency to return as well as turn into something more serious and more long term. Don't take a chance and think your back pain is just temporary or that taking a substance to mask the pain is the fix. Chiropractors are highly trained to evaluate and provide care for the back and spine. Chiropractors look to the source of LBP and focus on correcting the cause and not just simply masking the symptoms. Get proactive with your health and call your local chiropractor today!

Source: Spine: April 15, 2012 - Volume 37 - Issue 8.
Copyright: LLC 2012

page toppage toppage top

House Introduces Bill to Expand Chiropractic Access...Military Retirees Families

A bill introduced last week in the House of Representatives and supported by the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) would expand access to chiropractic services to military retirees, dependents and survivors through the Department of Defense TRICARE health program. The legislation (H.R. 4973), introduced by Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) and Rep. Dave Loebsack (D-Iowa), would not only enable those who currently receive chiropractic care to continue their treatment but would also establish, in the wake of the nationwide opioid crisis, an important non-drug option for pain management in the program. "Chiropractors have become valued members of the military health care team. Their non-drug, non-addictive and noninvasive approach to pain management has proven effective in helping members of the military to recover from injuries, manage chronic pain and enhance their readiness for duty," said ACA President David Herd, DC. "This bill would ensure that military retirees and military family members have access to the same quality care." Chiropractic services were first made available to active-duty military personnel following the enactment in 2000 of legislation to create a permanent chiropractic benefit within the Department of Defense health care system. As part of the pilot program before full implementation, retirees, dependents and survivors were also granted access to chiropractic services on a space-available basis. At the time, it was found that the benefit was valued within the TRICARE community. Today, chiropractic is available only to active-duty service members at more than 60 military treatment facilities in the United States, as well as bases in Germany and Japan. Chiropractors focus on disorders of the musculoskeletal system, most often treating complaints such as back pain, neck pain, pain in the joints of the arms or legs and headaches. Widely known for their expertise in spinal manipulation, chiropractors are also trained to recommend therapeutic and rehabilitative exercises, and to provide dietary and lifestyle counseling.

Author: American Chiropractic Association
Source: online, February 14, 2018.
Copyright: American Chiropractic Association 2018

page toppage toppage top

Jump For Your Adjustment!

Looking to increase athletic performance and possibly your vertical jump height? Give an adjustment a try! A small blinded trial was conducted recently in young female athletes who were suffering from ankle joint dysfunction to see if an adjustment to the joint could affect their vertical jump height. The ankle joint, more technically referred to as the talocrural joint, is the joint formed from the ends of the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula) and the top bone of the ankle, the talus. Half of the female athletes with ankle joint dysfunction received an adjustment to their ankle joint once a week for three weeks while the other half received a sham treatment once a week for three weeks. On average, those receiving the adjustment to their ankle joint saw an average 0.47 cm increase in their vertical jump as compared with the sham group. It’s important to recognize that adjustments provided by doctors of chiropractic can be delivered to and benefit more than just the joints of the spine. If you or someone you know is suffering from pain or dysfunction, or is simply looking to enhance their physical performance and overall health, give your local chiropractor a call today!

Source: JMPT. February 2014. Vol. 37; Issue 2.
Copyright: LLC 2014

page toppage toppage top

Obesity Linked to Chronic Back Pain

In a study published in the January 2013 issue of Spine, researchers in Norway have established a positive link between obesity and chronic lower back pain. The study was backed by census data of nearly twenty thousand men and women, aged 30-69 years and collected over a decade. Participants were divided into two groups; people without chronic back pain and those already experiencing chronic back pain. For the purposes of the study, 'chronic back pain' was defined as pain persisting for at least three months continuously over a year. The results, adjusted for age, physical activity levels, and other health factors indicated that the subjects who were 30 or more pounds overweight were 28 percent more likely to experience chronic lower back pain. The researchers pointed out that while the obesity may lead to the lower back pain, it is also possible that the lower back pain may lead to an increase in the subjects' obesity, due to decreased physical activity.

Source: Spine: 15 January 2013 - Volume 38 - Issue 2 - p 133–139.
Copyright: LLC 2013

page toppage toppage top

Articles 1-4 of 4 << first < previous next > last >